Business-and-music-related observations and comment.

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More random musings.

One nice thing about being repeatedly hacked in your email and social networking accounts is hearing back from old friends and business colleagues you haven't been in touch with for years.

In my case I can't say that everyone on my spammed contact list has been entirely pleased to hear from me—or who they thought was me—but their responses have got me thinking.

Hundreds of folks are now wondering how I've been able to start so many multi-million-dollar home businesses this year and successfully sell cheap meds on the side (while maintaining a consulting practice).

Well I've decided to exploit this opportunity and share my trade secrets in a new book, How You Can Make Millions From Getting Hacked & Spammed In Your Spare Time. (The first step will be "don't give up that AOL account.") Subtitle: Business Lessons From Viagra.

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A case of The Weepies.

In my eternal quest for interesting and creative rock/pop artists to glean business lessons from, I've expanded my search to include acoustic performers, singer-songwriters, and contemporary folk artists.

In the process I've discovered a bonanza of twenty-first century musicians who are doing innovative (and fun) stuff. Exhibit A is the Weepies, a fast-rising indie-folk-pop duo whose music has been featured on 'Grey's Anatomy', the Sex and the City movie, and an Obama presidential campaign ad.

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No job experience? Cool. You're hired!

About fifty years ago (the exact date is debatable) a small business team that would become the most commercially successful entity in the history of the performing arts made a significant—and risky—new addition, which would forever alter the organization's brand.

What made the hiring risky was the fact that this individual—who immediately became a full partner in the fledgling enterprise—had zero performing experience and almost no technical ability to do the job.

But the senior partner, John Lennon, prevailed on his mates, Paul McCartney and George Harrison, to bring his friend Stu Sutcliffe on board—and the band that was to become the Beatles began to take shape. (Pete Best would join a few months later.)

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Business lessons from the Dead

The March issue of The Atlantic carries an engaging article, "Management Secrets From the Grateful Dead."

In it, Joshua Green writes: "The Dead's influence on the business world may turn out to be a significant part of its legacy… The band pioneered ideas and practices that were subsequently embraced by corporate America."

This is not headline news to blfr readers (see my earlier post and comments) but it's nice to see some mainstream acceptance of the notion that rock bands have a few things to teach us in business matters.

Green goes on to argue that the Dead were savvy businessmen who jumped all over merchandising as a key revenue source and were ahead of the curve in their "customer first" orientation and determination to deliver superior customer value.

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Cloud illusions: Joni Mitchell weighs-in on web backups.

Confused about the risks/rewards of cloud computing? Squeamish about storing your data and apps on the internet—on remote servers and computers? You're not alone.

In fact Joni Mitchell expressed ambivalence about the cloud decades ago in her brilliant song "Both Sides Now" (video below). She noted the fairy-tale promises of web-based computing ("ice cream castles in the air") and yet she saw both sides of the issue and even questioned her initial love affair with it.

Sure, storing data & apps on the cloud assures unlimited storage, lower computer costs, universal document access, increased computer performance, improved data reliability, device independence, easier group collaboration—but there are still downsides.

Of course Joni couldn't go into detail in a three-and-a-half minute song, but she recognized that using the cloud requires a continuous internet connection, entails some loss of control, and runs the risk of proprietary data being stolen or lost. (That was her precise point in the now-famous line: "Something's lost but something's gained in living every day.")

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