Echo in the canyon

Just getting around to talking up this documentary, which was released last year but is available—as of this moment—on Netflix, Apple TV, and Amazon Prime.

As a ‘60s rock exceptionalist, I’m a sucker for a flick like this. I’ve always believed the songs of that era are unequaled in rock/pop history. Yes, I swooned over the rock & roll of the 50s. (I stayed home "sick" for months of elementary school to make sure I didn't miss the first 30 minutes of American Bandstand.) But R&R suffered a quick demise in 1959 (“The Day the Music Died”). Fortunately, five years later The Beatles reinvented rock, and I became a born-again believer. 18 months later the folk-rockers made a lyrical upgrade, and I became a lifer.

In the summer of 1965—thanks to Dylan and The Byrds (“Like a Rolling Stone” and “Mr. Tambourine Man”)—this primitive musical form was becoming a vehicle for art and poetry. Many fans shifted from consumers to analysts—deconstructing their favorite singles and albums like exegetes interpreting sacred texts. Such was the power and poetry of that music, especially what was coming out of Los Angeles.

Echo in the Canyon is an 82-minute rock doc that traces the music of this period—1965 to 1967 mostly—through the songs of The Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, Beach Boys, and Mamas and Papas. These pop pioneers lived, hung out, and swapped songs (and occasionally lovers) in the Hollywood Hills, in the woodsy neighborhoods of Laurel Canyon. This quickly became an innovation nexus that changed music forever.

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