The greatest rock & roll record of all time.

I was recently asked if I could name one record that epitomizes rock & roll—one track that embodies its spirit and pulse, in all its insolent glory. A preposterously tall order I thought. But I was already hooked.

So I pondered the great rock tours-de-force over the years, from 'Satisfaction' by the Rolling Stones to 'Rock & Roll Hoochie Coo' by Rick Derringer to 'Old Time Rock & Roll' by Bob Seger. I thought I might even include a recent tune for my short list: Green Day's 'Know Your Enemy'.

But the truth be told, these songs—and many other such classics from the last four decades—rocked more than rolled. The real heart and soul of this musical revolution, in my humble opinion, is best captured in the swaying, fluid rhythms of its 1950s pioneers—the true R&R architects—who had some swing in their rock.

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The role of rock.

Watching the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame concert on cable tv this week, I was reminded what rock brings to the party.

Bono put it beautifully when he pronounced from the stage: 'For a lot of us here rock & roll just means one word: liberation!'

Then Bruce Springsteen standing next to him, concerned that Bono might be taking things a tad too seriously, piped up, 'Let's have some fun with this.'

These two statements together capture the rock equation for me. R&R = freedom + joy. And this, as I repeatedly argue on these pages, is a spirit that business is in desperate need of—especially now, when surveys show that workplace morale is plummeting. (An estimate suggests that sixty-five percent of US workers are looking for a new job!)

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